Microdermabrasion FAQ’s

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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Is it new?

Microdermabrasion has been in use for over 20 years, millions of treatments have been performed worldwide.

Is it painful?

Absolutely not. Without reaching the critical peeling depth Peel Professional™ Microdermabrasion remains free of discomfort and pain. The action of the crystals and the hand piece is extremely gentle on the skin. The intensity of the treatment (the rate of crystal flow and vacuum pressure) is completely controllable by the therapist.

How many treatments do I require?

The number of treatments required is dependant on the skin condition. Most common conditions require between 6 – 10 sessions. A maintenance session is recommended every 6 – 12 weeks.

When will I see results?

You will start to see results after the first session. Over the course of treatments the appearance of the skin and its texture improves.

Is it risk-free of allergy?

Aluminium oxide crystals used are completely inert and cannot cause a reaction.

Is it risk-free of scars and pigmentation?

Far from causing scars, Microdermabrasion is used to treat them. Pigmentation problems can only occur if the peeling depth reaches melanocytes in the base membrane. The base membrane is only reached during scar treatment.

 

Will I need to avoid sunlight after a treatment?

Yes. As we are removing some of your skin’s natural protection from sunlight temporarily after each treatment, you will need to avoid tanning the area and wear an spf30 on the treated area for at least 1 week post treatment.

 

I've been told I may break out after a treatment. Is this true?

Most clients feel they have very clear skin after each treatment, however a small percentage of clients may experience some break out activity after a treatment. This occurs because we are encouraging new cell formation and a more rapid turnover of skin cells in the treated area. If any congestion is lying under the skin surface, this can be brought to the surface quicker resulting in breakout.